Movie Guide To Everything http://movieguideto.com All things about movies Fri, 23 Jun 2017 06:21:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8 39 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About "Doctor Who" http://movieguideto.com/awesome/39-things-you-probably-didnt-know-about-doctor-who/ http://movieguideto.com/awesome/39-things-you-probably-didnt-know-about-doctor-who/#respond Fri, 23 Jun 2017 06:21:46 +0000 http://buzzfeed.com/tomphillips/timey-wimey-facty-wacty It’s about time. BF_STATIC.timequeue.push(function () { if (BF_STATIC.bf_test_mode) localStorage.setItem(‘posted_date’, 1407508592); }); BF_STATIC.timequeue.push(function () { document.getElementById(“update_posted_time_3403472”).innerHTML = “posted on ” + UI.dateFormat.get_formatted_date(1407508592); }); View this image › BBC/Pitris/Tom Phillips/BuzzFeed 1. When he was 13, David Tennant wrote in a school essay called “Intergalactic Overdose” that he was “convinced” he was “going to play the part of […]

The post 39 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About "Doctor Who" appeared first on Movie Guide To Everything.

]]>
It’s about time. BF_STATIC.timequeue.push(function () { if (BF_STATIC.bf_test_mode) localStorage.setItem(‘posted_date’, 1407508592); }); BF_STATIC.timequeue.push(function () { document.getElementById(“update_posted_time_3403472”).innerHTML = “posted on ” + UI.dateFormat.get_formatted_date(1407508592); });

View this image ›

BBC/Pitris/Tom Phillips/BuzzFeed

1. When he was 13, David Tennant wrote in a school essay called “Intergalactic Overdose” that he was “convinced” he was “going to play the part of the Doctor on TV”.

2. The Weeping Angels aren’t props – they’re played by actresses in stone costumes who have to stay very, very still.

3. The noise the TARDIS makes was created by rubbing piano strings with a key.

4. Nicholas Briggs, the voice of the Daleks in recent series, had to bring along his own analogue voice modulator to create the voice as the BBC couldn’t find a way to replicate their distinctive sound digitally.

5. In an early draft of the very first Doctor Who script, it’s strongly implied that the Doctor is planning to kill future companions Ian and Barbara in order to protect his secret. This was quickly taken out.

6. Wendy Padbury, the agent who discovered Matt Smith as a young actor, played the second Doctor’s companion Zoe Heriot in the late 1960s.

7. In fact, three of the actresses who played the Doctor’s companions went on to become agents, and all of them ended up representing actors who would play the Doctor.

8. In 1988, Paramount Pictures wanted to make a Doctor Who movie starring either Michael Jackson or Bill Cosby as the Doctor.

Phil Walter / Getty Images

Jemal Countess / Getty Images

 

9. The first Doctor Who novel had the unwieldy title Doctor Who in an Exciting Adventure With the Daleks.

10. The name “Time Lord” to describe the Doctor’s people wasn’t used until 1969, five-and-a-half years after the show started. It was another four-and-a-half years before his home planet was named on screen as “Gallifrey”.

11. Shouty actor Brian Blessed claims he was offered the role of the Second Doctor (which eventually went to Patrick Troughton), but turned it down.

12. Other than the TARDIS herself, the companion that was with the Doctor for the longest time was probably Handles the disembodied Cyberman head.

13. Peter Capaldi used to be in a punk band with Late Late Show host Craig Ferguson:

View this image ›

Sounds magazine

14. The Doctor has been married three times (that we know about) – to Queen Elizabeth I, Marilyn Monroe, and River Song.

15. Tennant is married to Georgia Moffett, who played the Doctor’s daughter opposite him in “The Doctor’s Daughter” and is actually the daughter of the fifth Doctor, Peter Davison. So the couple’s children have Doctors for their father and grandfather.

16. Tom Baker’s famously long scarf as the fourth Doctor was created partly by accident. The knitter hired to create it, Begonia Pope, wasn’t told how long it needed to be, so just used up all the wool she was given. It ended up 20 feet long (but was eventually trimmed down a bit).

17. In 2009 a group of volunteers clearing a pond in Hampshire found a submerged Dalek. It’s not clear how it got there.

View this image ›

Solent News

18. The gas masks in “The Empty Child” were made in part from cans of baked beans after attempts to find authentic WWII gas masks failed because they contain dangerous asbestos.

19. Peter Capaldi and sixth Doctor Colin Baker are the only actors to have been cast as the Doctor after previously appearing in the series as another character.

20. The 2008 episode “The Fires of Pompeii” was notable for having a future companion and a future Doctor in its cast as different characters – Karen Gillan and Capaldi.

BBC

BBC

 

21. Peter Hawkins, the original voice of the Daleks, went on to voice the character of Zippy in children’s TV show Rainbow. He was replaced as Zippy after the first series by Roy Skelton – who had also replaced him as the voice of the Daleks.

22. As teenagers, fourth Doctor Tom Baker trained to become a Roman Catholic monk, and seventh Doctor Sylvester McCoy trained to become a priest.

23. A 1966 internal BBC memo about the Doctor’s first regeneration suggested it was supposed to be like a really bad LSD trip:

View this image ›

BBC Archive bbc.co.uk

24. One of the earliest story ideas for Doctor Who was a version of Dickens’ A Christmas Carol, but with a “slightly tipsy” Doctor as Jacob Marley. (The series finally did a loose adaptation of A Christmas Carol in 2010, but with added sharks.)

25. Verity Lambert, Doctor Who’s first producer, was both the youngest producer in the BBC’s drama department and the only woman in such a role.

26. In a previous job on ITV’s Armchair Theatre series in 1958, Lambert – then just a production assistant – had to unexpectedly step in to studio-direct a live broadcast of a play after one of the actors died during transmission.

27. A teenage Capaldi had his Doctor Who fan art published in Doctor Who International Fan Club Magazine.

View this image ›

DWIFC Magazine courtesy of Matthew Kilburn theeventlibrary.wordpress.com

28. The young Capaldi was so desperate to be put in charge of the Official Doctor Who Fan Club that he bombarded the BBC with letters to the point where the producer’s secretary said: “I wish the Daleks or someone would exterminate him.”

29. In 2007, Hugh Grant told The Sun that he’d been offered the role of the Doctor but turned it down because he didn’t think the new show would be a success.

30. The person who was originally supposed to design the Daleks was Ridley Scott – later the director of Alien and Gladiator – but he left his job at the BBC before he could get around to it.

31. An audience research report from 1988 showed that Bonnie Langford’s character, Mel, was “unpopular” (to say the least) with viewers – “56% of respondents who answered a questionnaire on the Paradise Towers story wished she had been eaten”.

32. The 1965 episode “Mission to the Unknown” is the only one in the series’ history that doesn’t feature the Doctor, the TARDIS, or any of his companions.

33. Alternative costume designs for Smith included one design that was described as being like a pirate:

doctorwho.tumblr.com

doctorwho.tumblr.com

doctorwho.tumblr.com

 

34. The Daleks might never have existed if comedian Tony Hancock hadn’t had a massive row with his then scriptwriter, Terry Nation. Nation was about to decline an offer to write the second Doctor Who story, but changed his mind when Hancock sacked him that night – luckily, before his agent had had a chance to turn the BBC down.

35. Doctor Who’s main creator, Sydney Newman, was furious about the inclusion of the Daleks, as he’d been adamant that he didn’t want clichéd “bug-eyed monsters” in his show. (He later admitted he might have been wrong about this.)

36. The fourth Doctor advertised computers on televison.

37. The words “Dalek” and “TARDIS” have become so widely used that they now both appear in the Oxford English Dictionary.

38. It’s not entirely clear what the Doctor is a doctor of. Over the years, he’s both claimed that he is a medical doctor and also denied it.

39. In 1995, Steven Moffat posted a “particularly stupid” fan theory to a Doctor Who news group. Sixteen years later, he used it as part of the plot of “A Good Man Goes to War”.

View this image ›

groups.google.com

Additional sources:

LINK

The Doctor Who's Who: The Story Behind Every Face of the Iconic Time Lord

LINK

Doctor Who: A History of the Universe in 100 Objects

LINK

Who-ology: Doctor Who, The Official Miscellany

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/tomphillips/timey-wimey-facty-wacty

The post 39 Things You Probably Didn’t Know About "Doctor Who" appeared first on Movie Guide To Everything.

]]>
http://movieguideto.com/awesome/39-things-you-probably-didnt-know-about-doctor-who/feed/ 0
Want to see more women calling the shots in Hollywood? Here are 5 things that need to happen. http://movieguideto.com/awesome/want-to-see-more-women-calling-the-shots-in-hollywood-here-are-5-things-that-need-to-happen/ http://movieguideto.com/awesome/want-to-see-more-women-calling-the-shots-in-hollywood-here-are-5-things-that-need-to-happen/#respond Thu, 22 Jun 2017 06:21:04 +0000 http://www.upworthy.com/want-to-see-more-women-calling-the-shots-in-hollywood-here-are-5-things-that-need-to-happen?c=tpstream The numbers don’t lie: There are almost zero female directors in Hollywood. Lena Dunham, one of the few women calling the shots in Hollywood. Photo by Randy Shropshire/Getty Images Entertainment. That also applies to women in other roles behind the camera, and even in front of it. In the top 700 grossing films from 2007 […]

The post Want to see more women calling the shots in Hollywood? Here are 5 things that need to happen. appeared first on Movie Guide To Everything.

]]>

The numbers don’t lie: There are almost zero female directors in Hollywood.

Lena Dunham, one of the few women calling the shots in Hollywood. Photo by Randy Shropshire/Getty Images Entertainment.

That also applies to women in other roles behind the camera, and even in front of it.

In the top 700 grossing films from 2007 to 2014, women made up only 30.2% of speaking roles. In 2014, only 1.9% of directors who made the top 100 grossing films were women.
And this is just from one study, conducted by the Media, Diversity, & Social Change Initiative at USC Annenberg.

A recent New York Times article uncovered some reasons (read: excuses) for why this is the case, from studios prioritizing movies with male leads because of foreign audiences to the confounding idea that women don’t want to direct blockbusters. (Spoiler alert: They do.)

The whole article is an engrossing, outrage-inducing read. Yet within the many anecdotes from female directors about discrimination they’ve experienced lie many potential solutions. Here are five:

1. The few women who do have a foot inside Hollywood’s door need to support other women.

Apparently, in Hollywood, women don’t often find support from other women. Even when some women make it to the top such as the ones who run two of Hollywood’s big six studios they don’t always extend a hand to other female directors or even actresses.

When an industry only makes room for one or two women to succeed, those women are less likely to support other women out of fear that they’ll be replaced by the very women they mentored.

Another fear that keeps women from working together in Hollywood is being pigeonholed as someone who can only work on movies for women. Former Sony Co-Chairperson Amy Pascal explained that after producing female-driven hits earlier in her tenure, she felt she wouldn’t be given a chance to make more mainstream projects.

Photo by Kevin Winter/Getty Images Entertainment.

As long as it’s every woman for herself, women are going to remain tokens in a male-dominated Hollywood. Many of the female directors and producers who spoke to the
New York Times stressed the importance of making change by working together.

Pascal herself is getting back to producing movies about women, including the all-female “Ghostbusters” reboot.

2. Men in Hollywood need to mentor outside their comfort zone i.e., they need to mentor women.

The Times piece opens with the charmed upward trajectory of director Colin Trevorrow, who went to the Sundance Film Festival with an indie romantic comedy. Pixar director Brad Bird (“The Incredibles”) then introduced him to Steven Spielberg, who picked Trevorrow to direct “Jurassic World.” Bird said he liked Trevorrow because Trevorrow “reminded me of me.” Meanwhile, director Leslye Headland also had her indie romantic comedy, “Bachelorette,” screen at Sundance and got no such recommendation or opportunity.

There could be many reasons why Headland didn’t come away from her Sundance screening with an opportunity like that. But Bird related to Trevorrow because he saw himself in him. So it makes (unfortunate) sense that women are less likely to get the opportunities their male counterparts get simply because the men who offer them don’t see themselves reflected in female directors.

Hollywood has to stop thinking of women-driven films as niche, or women directors as too unrelatable to mentor. And men in positions of power in Hollywood need to make sure they’re mentoring women just as often as they’re mentoring men.

3. The success of people like Shonda Rhimes, Jennifer Lawrence, and Amy Schumer shouldn’t be exceptions to the rule.


As far as Hollywood is concerned, “The Hunger Games” succeeded only because of Jennifer Lawrence, “Trainwreck” succeeded only because of of Amy Schumer, and “Scandal” and “How to Get Away With Murder” are only successes because of Shonda Rhimes not because women in general are capable of creating films and shows for a large audience, but because these specific few, rare women are talented enough to have mainstream appeal.

Successful female-driven films and TV shows are thought to be exceptions to the rule, rather than profitable and resonant in their own right. And when a female-driven film or show flops, it’s often assumed that it flopped because of women, even though when movies with male leads flop, the overwhelming maleness of the film is never cited as a reason why.

Luckily, there are Hollywood power players who are investing in women-directed films and television shows. Besides Rhimes, a powerful producer and show-runner, there’s Reese Witherspoon, Meryl Streep, and Geena Davis, as well as Will Ferrell and Adam McKay, who are all championing female directors, screenwriters, and characters through their nonprofit organizations and production companies.

“If everyone’s gonna pass on all the strong, ass-kicking lady directors and writers out there, we’ll take them,” says McKay.

4. Hollywood needs to let women be themselves on set.

There are two glaring examples of this in the NYT piece. The first is the case of “Twilight” director Catherine Hardwicke, who wasn’t considered to direct the rest of the franchise after helming the first movie because she was “overly emotional,” crying on set during a particularly hard day. And the second is the great Barbra Streisand, who was derided for being “indecisive” when she asked for input on the set of “Yentl.”

Yet directors like David O. Russell keep directing Oscar contenders even after he’s come to blows with George Clooney, shouted at Lily Tomlin on set, and allegedly “abused” Amy Adams on the set of “American Hustle,” according to the Sony email hack.


Cinematographer Rachel Morrison told the NYT about how, when she finally couldn’t hide her pregnancy anymore, people stopped booking her on jobs.

“It should have been up to me if I was capable to work or not,” Morrison said. As much as male directors are given free rein over their sets and their schedules and their emotional outbursts the same opportunities should be available to women.

5. Women should feel just as empowered and entitled to help themselves as their male peers do.

It’s inevitable that all this sexism is internalized, at least somewhat. Which is probably why Lucasfilm President Kathleen Kennedy told the Times that no woman expressed interest to her in directing “Star Wars.” It’s also why, as director Allison Anders explained, that in Hollywood negotiations, “The men are like: ‘Oh please, yes. I want to do this.’ Women are a little too suspicious, too cautious and a little too precious about their reality.”

This is the “Lean In” phenomenon. Women need to lean in and ask for more in order to get success. And that’s good advice for individual women to internalize, but does it help on a systemic level?

As “Girls” creator Lena Dunham pointed out, there is a flaw in putting the pressure on women to fix the problems in a system where sexism is so prevalent and power is so often held by men:

“I feel like we do too much telling women: ‘You aren’t aggressive enough. You haven’t made yourself known enough.’ And it’s like, women shouldn’t be having to hustle twice as fast to get what men achieve just by showing up.”

So how do we fix this?

We’re seeing progress, slowly but surely, as more and more female-driven films and shows succeed. And even industry executives can’t deny the pattern of what shows and movies are bringing in the most money.

But there are two things that need to happen to make sure this progress continues until we reach a point of gender parity: One, women have to fight for themselves and support each other, and two, men have to support women too.

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/want-to-see-more-women-calling-the-shots-in-hollywood-here-are-5-things-that-need-to-happen?c=tpstream

The post Want to see more women calling the shots in Hollywood? Here are 5 things that need to happen. appeared first on Movie Guide To Everything.

]]>
http://movieguideto.com/awesome/want-to-see-more-women-calling-the-shots-in-hollywood-here-are-5-things-that-need-to-happen/feed/ 0
Embroidery Remix Tops The Morning Links http://movieguideto.com/awesome/embroidery-remix-tops-the-morning-links/ http://movieguideto.com/awesome/embroidery-remix-tops-the-morning-links/#respond Wed, 21 Jun 2017 06:21:35 +0000 http://buzzfeed.com/emilyorley/embroidery-remix-tops-the-morning-links View this image › Richard Saja New Israeli Law Bans BMI-Challenged Models – [ABC] 11 Groundbreaking Fashion Magazine Covers – [Time] Behold, Peter Jackson’s Cameo in ‘The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey’ – [Next Movie] Marijuana Smoothie, Anyone? – [Salon] Royally Brewed Beer – [Slate] The Google Maps of the Future Sounds Useful but Creepy – […]

The post Embroidery Remix Tops The Morning Links appeared first on Movie Guide To Everything.

]]>

Richard Saja

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/emilyorley/embroidery-remix-tops-the-morning-links

The post Embroidery Remix Tops The Morning Links appeared first on Movie Guide To Everything.

]]>
http://movieguideto.com/awesome/embroidery-remix-tops-the-morning-links/feed/ 0
What Will The “Game Change” Sequel Be About? http://movieguideto.com/awesome/what-will-the-game-change-sequel-be-about/ http://movieguideto.com/awesome/what-will-the-game-change-sequel-be-about/#respond Tue, 20 Jun 2017 06:21:51 +0000 http://buzzfeed.com/jordanzakarin/what-will-the-game-change-sequel-be-about View this image › The Associated Press / AP Danny Strong and Jay Roach keep up with the news, even when it’s not going to serve as fodder for one of their movies. Speaking with BuzzFeed at the Peabody Awards on Monday, the writer and director of last year’s HBO film Game Change, which chronicled […]

The post What Will The “Game Change” Sequel Be About? appeared first on Movie Guide To Everything.

]]>

The Associated Press / AP

Danny Strong and Jay Roach keep up with the news, even when it’s not going to serve as fodder for one of their movies.

Speaking with BuzzFeed at the Peabody Awards on Monday, the writer and director of last year’s HBO film Game Change, which chronicled Sarah Palin’s troubled bid for the vice presidency, tapped into one of several scandals broiling in Washington in service of a quick laugh.

“Danny and I are both being audited by the IRS because we had a fair [number of] mentions in our emails of ‘Tea Party’ and ‘Patriots,’” Roach joked, nodding to the current controversy over the federal agency’s recent admission that it targeted conservative organizations for extra scrutiny. “We’re having tax troubles now,” he added with a laugh.

The duo, who won Emmys last year for the film and were on hand to collect Peabodys for the effort as well, showed they could be bipartisan when it comes to gentle antagonism, but their next collaboration may be another tale of Republican drama. Just a month after the 2012 election, HBO announced that it was developing a film based on the forthcoming chronicle of the campaign by John Heilemann and Mark Halperin, the authors of the book on which Game Change was based. Roach and Strong hedged when asked whether they would return for the sequel, but given their long, successful relationship (they also collaborated on HBO’s 2000 election film Recount) and chatter around the project, it’s not a bad bet that they’ll be back in the saddle for the premium cable network.

In fact, they’re willing to openly speculate about possible storylines that the movie could follow.

“The Republican primary, pre-Iowa caucus, was pretty amazing,” Strong said. “Just all those debates and all those characters. You had Herman Cain, Michele Bachman — it was the most amazing group of characters. Donald Trump, Rick Perry. You had a new hero of the week each week. As I was watching it, it was incredibly entertaining and pretty fascinating.”

Strong added: “And then the Iowa caucus came, and then it kind of wiped out the colorful, fringe candidates and was pretty much more just the serious people that had long careers in government. It got a little less entertaining, but I still enjoyed it.”

Roach was quick to point out that the Obama campaign had its “fascinating” moments as well, and they would wait to see what dirt Heilemann and Halperin produced for their book. In the meantime, he was willing to at least speculate what it would take to cast a Mitt Romney who could match up to Julianne Moore’s Emmy-winning portrayal of Sarah Palin.

“It’s interesting, performance does a lot of it, but the looks are important too,” the director said. “We would probably spend a ton of time, like we did with Sarah Palin, Photoshopping the hair, and you really have to sit and study people and make sure they can pull it off. Because they audience wants a little bit of verisimilitude on top of good performance.”

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/jordanzakarin/what-will-the-game-change-sequel-be-about

The post What Will The “Game Change” Sequel Be About? appeared first on Movie Guide To Everything.

]]>
http://movieguideto.com/awesome/what-will-the-game-change-sequel-be-about/feed/ 0
Acting That Doesn’t Make You Cringe: Coming To A Game Console Near You http://movieguideto.com/awesome/acting-that-doesnt-make-you-cringe-coming-to-a-game-console-near-you/ http://movieguideto.com/awesome/acting-that-doesnt-make-you-cringe-coming-to-a-game-console-near-you/#respond Mon, 19 Jun 2017 06:21:11 +0000 http://buzzfeed.com/josephbernstein/acting-that-doesnt-make-you-cringe-coming-to-a-game-console 6/14: This piece was published last week. The Last of Us is out today. View this image › For more than a decade, major game developers have undertaken a strange and grueling quest: to wring convincing emotion from computer-generated actors. As anyone who plays games will know, the results along the way have been poor. […]

The post Acting That Doesn’t Make You Cringe: Coming To A Game Console Near You appeared first on Movie Guide To Everything.

]]>

6/14: This piece was published last week. The Last of Us is out today.

For more than a decade, major game developers have undertaken a strange and grueling quest: to wring convincing emotion from computer-generated actors. As anyone who plays games will know, the results along the way have been poor. Fans euphemistically refer to the “Uncanny Valley”, but that term hardly conveys the dead eyes, action-figure gestures, any-which-way lip twitching, and sociopath pauses that characterize virtual “acting”. Add to the problems of human representation incompetent dialogue, plotting, and virtual camerawork and you have a basic understanding of why the oft-cited ambition of game makers to tell mature stories strikes so many adult gamers as a fantasy.

The consequences of this quest have occasionally been dire. When we look back at the history of Square, one of the proud software developers in gaming, we will remember the 2001 Final Fantasy X, with its introduction of charmless virtual actors, as the moment the company began its long slide into irrelevance. The list of potentially great games ruined for adults by bad virtual acting and storytelling is long indeed.

I’m not picking on game developers. Making computer-generated creatures plausible emoters isn’t a problem unique to this medium—it’s a problem unique to computers. Remember the accolades showered on James Cameron’s Avatar in 2008 simply for creating digital actors that didn’t make the audience start laughing? Simply: that movie cost half a billion dollars. It’s just a hard thing to do. Given the natural strengths of games—interactivity and engagement—the pursuit of convincing virtual actors could be considered a massive waste of resources. Imagine the games we might have had over the past decade-plus if the money and talent spent on the aggregated costs of virtual acting had been invested in game design; AAA games might not be stuck in their current creative morass.

But then we wouldn’t have The Last of Us, the new game from Naughty Dog, which comes out next week. It’s the first video game I have ever played that features virtual acting good enough to successfully tell a story for adults. At no point in the twelve hours of the game, which is about a grizzled smuggler’s relationship with the teenage girl he is paid to protect from zombies and bandits on a journey across a blasted America, did I laugh at the wrong moment, skip a cut scene, cringe with embarrassment, or, worst of all, lose interest. There were four or five moments of plot throughout the game where I was fully compelled, engaged to the point of involuntarily placing my hand over my gasping mouth. When I finished the game, I thought to myself, wow, that was a good story, told competently. I don’t mean to damn The Last of Us with faint praise. Competent genre storytelling with virtual actors is a major, perhaps historically significant accomplishment for the medium.

And here’s why: narrative games don’t need Academy Award-caliber acting to achieve their goals (although voice actors as good as Troy Baker and Ashley Johnson in the lead roles of Joel and Ellie certainly help). All the scripted acting in games needs to do is to reinforce, or not actively detract from everything else that happens in the player-controlled part of the game. The Last of Us certainly passes that test. Joel and Ellie are two of the most convincingly rendered virtual actors in the history of games. They certainly don’t look real, but they are a noticeable improvement on the virtual actors in the Mass Effect series, games with similarly great writing, voice acting, and narrative aspirations that were undercut by their visuals.

But it also goes beyond acting and plot not undermining gameplay. There are a few moments in the second half of the game, the specifics of which I am not allowed to discuss per Sony’s omerta, in which a cut scene segues into a gameplay sequence in a way that actively enriches both. One such transition produced in me something I’ve never before experienced in a narrative game: a sense of the sublime.

Competent acting and storytelling invest the player in the gameplay itself. It seems so obvious, and yet so few games have ever pulled it off: When you care about the characters in the game, you want to keep playing, in the same way you want to binge on The Sopranos to see what happens to Tony, or keep reading A Game of Thrones to see what happens to Ned.

And it turns out that good storytelling is a salve for so many of the issues that plague big budget games. The violence of The Last of Us doesn’t feel gratuitous because you care about the characters. The zombie-game clichés don’t grate because you care about the characters. The vestigial gaminess (Joel can only upgrade his equipment on certain special tables placed at regular intervals throughout the game even though there are flat surfaces everywhere; there is always a wooden pallet nearby when Ellie, who cannot swim, needs to cross a body of water, etc.) feel forgivable because you care about the characters.

(And isn’t it interesting that the two games in the past year that have created fully sympathetic characters are both zombie games? I’m referring, of course, to Lee and Clementine in The Walking Dead, who I think are probably too cartoony to be considered virtual actors. This genre, as stale as it can seem, forces drama on its characters in a way that is both insistent and intimate. That latter piece is what’s missing in most game drama.)

So, yes The Last of Us is a remarkable game, the best I’ve played this year, and it feels almost flamboyantly good compared to the rest of the AAA dreck on the market. Here’s the thing: I’m not sure if what this game does is a solution for anyone else. Naughty Dog have been working towards this moment for a long time, at least since the beginning of this console generation with the first Uncharted game in 2007. They have access to Sony’s war chest. They have, probably, the best writers in the business. And they have an abiding love and deep understanding of popular culture outside of the world of videogames, while still knowing what makes games great. That’s rare and maybe unique—most good developers only have the latter and one or two only have the former.

In other words, don’t expect games with this kind of narrative quality to flood the market anytime soon. The Last of Us is the first of its kind, and I expect will be the only one of its kind, for quite a while.

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/josephbernstein/acting-that-doesnt-make-you-cringe-coming-to-a-game-console

The post Acting That Doesn’t Make You Cringe: Coming To A Game Console Near You appeared first on Movie Guide To Everything.

]]>
http://movieguideto.com/awesome/acting-that-doesnt-make-you-cringe-coming-to-a-game-console-near-you/feed/ 0
20 Amazing Letters Worth Reading http://movieguideto.com/awesome/20-amazing-letters-worth-reading/ http://movieguideto.com/awesome/20-amazing-letters-worth-reading/#respond Sun, 18 Jun 2017 06:21:20 +0000 http://twistedsifter.com/2015/02/20-amazing-letters-worth-reading/ Since 2009, Shaun Usher has curated the incredible blog, Letters of Note; a collection of fascinating letters, postcards, telegrams, faxes and memos throughout history. Usher has carefully catalogued nearly 1000 letters and going through the archive is a recurring ritual for the Sifter. Last year, 125 of the most entertaining, inspiring and unusual letters from […]

The post 20 Amazing Letters Worth Reading appeared first on Movie Guide To Everything.

]]>
Since 2009, Shaun Usher has curated the incredible blog, Letters of Note; a collection of fascinating letters, postcards, telegrams, faxes and memos throughout history. Usher has carefully catalogued nearly 1000 letters and going through the archive is a recurring ritual for the Sifter.

Last year, 125 of the most entertaining, inspiring and unusual letters from the blog were printed in a spectacular 352-page hardcover book published by Chronicle. You can find UK versions here and US versions here. You can also find exclusive limited editions and signed versions through Unbound.

Below you will find 20 notable letters from the extensive archives. For more, be sure to check out Letters of Note at the links below.

LETTERS OF NOTE
Website | Facebook | Tumblr | Twitter | Buy the book

1. Kurt Vonnegut Replies to Students

In 2006 Ms. Lockwood, an English teacher at Xavier High School, asked her students to write a letter to a famous author. She wanted them discuss the author’s work and ask for advice. Kurt Vonnegut (1922 – 2007) was the only one to write back. [via alxmog1 on reddit]

Dear Xavier High School, and Ms. Lockwood, and Messrs Perin, McFeely, Batten, Maurer and Congiusta:
 
I thank you for your friendly letters. You sure know how to cheer up a really old geezer (84) in his sunset years. I don’t make public appearances any more because I now resemble nothing so much as an iguana.
 
What I had to say to you, moreover, would not take long, to wit: Practice any art, music, singing, dancing, acting, drawing, painting, sculpting, poetry, fiction, essays, reportage, no matter how well or badly, not to get money and fame, but to experience becoming, to find out what’s inside you, to make your soul grow.
 
Seriously! I mean starting right now, do art and do it for the rest of your lives. Draw a funny or nice picture of Ms. Lockwood, and give it to her. Dance home after school, and sing in the shower and on and on. Make a face in your mashed potatoes. Pretend you’re Count Dracula.
 
Here’s an assignment for tonight, and I hope Ms. Lockwood will flunk you if you don’t do it: Write a six line poem, about anything, but rhymed. No fair tennis without a net. Make it as good as you possibly can. But don’t tell anybody what you’re doing. Don’t show it or recite it to anybody, not even your girlfriend or parents or whatever, or Ms. Lockwood. OK?
 
Tear it up into teeny-weeny pieces, and discard them into widely separated trash recepticals. You will find that you have already been gloriously rewarded for your poem. You have experienced becoming, learned a lot more about what’s inside you, and you have made your soul grow.
 
God bless you all!
 
Kurt Vonnegut

kurt-vonnegut's-signature

Kurt Vonnegut’s awesome signature

2. Bill Watterson’s Comic Advice

Back in the 1980s, photographer and Calvin and Hobbes fan Todd Church wrote a letter to Calvin and Hobbes creator Bill Watterson who wrote back this amazing letter with helpful tips and advice about comic strip cartooning. [Todd Church via Letters of Note]

letter-from-bill-watterson-calvin-and-hobbes

Dear Todd,
 
Thank you for your letter. Here are some general comic strip cartooning tips that I’ve tried to make helpful for people at all levels of advancement. I hope these will apply to your work.
 
1. Materials are not important, so long as your work reproduces and reduces clearly. It’s what you do WITH the materials that counts.
2. I think characters are more important than jokes. Any cartoonist ought to be able to come up with funny gags, but the best strips have rounded, complex characters that readers can care about. Cartoon characters should be more than standing props to deliver jokes.
3. Don’t imitate other strips. Editors are looking for something new and original.
4. Most importantly, have fun with your work, and practice writing and drawing all you can.
 
Good luck,
W.B. Watterson

3. Gandhi Writes to Hitler to Stop War

In the events leading up to the start of World War II, Gandhi wrote two letters (this is the first) to Adolf Hitler, asking him, as the “one person in the world who can prevent a war”, to do so. [Wikimedia Commons via Letters of Note]

gandhi-letter-to-hitler

Dear friend,
 
Friends have been urging me to write to you for the sake of humanity. But I have resisted their request, because of the feeling that any letter from me would be an impertinence. Something tells me that I must not calculate and that I must make my appeal for whatever it may be worth.
 
It is quite clear that you are today the one person in the world who can prevent a war which may reduce humanity to a savage state. Must you pay that price for an object however worthy it may appear to you to be? Will you listen to the appeal of one who has deliberately shunned the method of war not without considerable success? Any way I anticipate your forgiveness, if I have erred in writing to you.
 
I remain,
Your sincere friend
M. K. Gandhi

4. Stephen Fry on Depression

In 2006 a young lady named Crystal Nunn was suffering from serious depression and felt she needed someone to confide in and ease the pain. She decided to write a letter to her hero, Stephen Fry, who himself had gone through stages of depression. [xchingx on deviantART via Letters of Note]

stephen-fry-letter-on-depression

Dear Crystal,
 
I’m so sorry to hear that life is getting you down at the moment. Goodness knows, it can be so tough when nothing seems to fit and little seems to be fulfilling. I’m not sure there’s any specific advice I can give that will help bring life back its savour. Although they mean well, it’s sometimes quite galling to be reminded how much people love you when you don’t love yourself that much.
 
I’ve found that it’s of some help to think of one’s moods and feelings about the world as being similar to weather:
 
Here are some obvious things about the weather:
 
It’s real.
You can’t change it by wishing it away.
If it’s dark and rainy it really is dark and rainy and you can’t alter it.
It might be dark and rainy for two weeks in a row.
 
BUT
 
It will be sunny one day.
It isn’t under one’s control as to when the sun comes out, but come out it will.
One day.
 
It really is the same with one’s moods, I think. The wrong approach is to believe that they are illusions. They are real. Depression, anxiety, listlessness – these are as real as the weather – AND EQUALLY NOT UNDER ONE’S CONTROL. Not one’s fault.
 
BUT
 
They will pass: they really will.
 
In the same way that one has to accept the weather, so one has to accept how one feels about life sometimes. “Today’s a crap day,” is a perfectly realistic approach. It’s all about finding a kind of mental umbrella. “Hey-ho, it’s raining inside: it isn’t my fault and there’s nothing I can do about it, but sit it out. But the sun may well come out tomorrow and when it does, I shall take full advantage.”
 
I don’t know if any of that is of any use: it may not seem it, and if so, I’m sorry. I just thought I’d drop you a line to wish you well in your search to find a little more pleasure and purpose in life.
 
Very best wishes
Stephen Fry

5. The Best Cover Letter Ever

After working in advertising as a copywriter in New York City, Robert Pirosh moved to Hollywood in 1934 with dreams of becoming a screenwriter. Below is a transcript of the cover letter he sent to all of the directors, producers and studio execs he could think of. Pirosh went on to win an Academy Award in 1949. [via Letters of Note]

Robert-Pirosh

Dear Sir:
 
I like words. I like fat buttery words, such as ooze, turpitude, glutinous, toady. I like solemn, angular, creaky words, such as straitlaced, cantankerous, pecunious, valedictory. I like spurious, black-is-white words, such as mortician, liquidate, tonsorial, demi-monde. I like suave “V” words, such as Svengali, svelte, bravura, verve. I like crunchy, brittle, crackly words, such as splinter, grapple, jostle, crusty. I like sullen, crabbed, scowling words, such as skulk, glower, scabby, churl. I like Oh-Heavens, my-gracious, land’s-sake words, such as tricksy, tucker, genteel, horrid. I like elegant, flowery words, such as estivate, peregrinate, elysium, halcyon. I like wormy, squirmy, mealy words, such as crawl, blubber, squeal, drip. I like sniggly, chuckling words, such as cowlick, gurgle, bubble and burp.
 
I like the word screenwriter better than copywriter, so I decided to quit my job in a New York advertising agency and try my luck in Hollywood, but before taking the plunge I went to Europe for a year of study, contemplation and horsing around.
 
I have just returned and I still like words.
 
May I have a few with you?
 
Robert Pirosh
385 Madison Avenue
Room 610
New York
Eldorado 5-6024

6. Bribing Tom Hanks

Back in 2012, Chris Hardwick (of The Nerdist podcast) tried to coax Tom Hanks into appearing on his show by sending him a rare 1934 Smith Corona typewriter. Hanks, an avid typewriter collector, sent back this letter to Chris. [The Nerdist via Letters of Note]

tom-hanks-typewriter-letter-nerdist

Dear Chris, Ashley, and all the diabolical genuies at Nerdist Industries.
 
Just who do you think you are to try to briibe me into an apperance on your ‘thing’ with this gift of the most fantastic Cornona Silent typewriter made in 1934?
 
You are out of your minds if you think… that I… wow, this thing has great action… and this deep crimson color… Wait! I’m not so shallow as to… and it types nearly silently…
 
Oh, OKAY!
 
I will have my people contact yours and work out some kind of interview process…
 
Damn you all to hell,

7. Steve Martin’s Generic Response Letter

Back in the 1980s, fans of actor Steve Martin received (mostly) generic response letters like this. This particular reply was sent to a teenage boy named Jerry. [Chattering Teeth via Letters of Note]

steve-martin-generic-letter

A PERSONAL LETTER FROM STEVE MARTIN
 
DEAR Jerry,
 
WHAT A PLEASURE IT WAS TO RECEIVE A LETTER FROM YOU. ALTHOUGH MY SCHEDULE IS VERY BUSY, I DECIDED TO TAKE TIME OUT TO WRITE YOU A PERSONAL REPLY.
 
TOO OFTEN PERFORMERS LOSE CONTACT WITH THEIR AUDIENCE AND BEGIN TO TAKE THEM FOR GRANTED, BUT I DON’T THINK THAT WILL EVER HAPPEN TO ME, WILL IT Jerry? I DON’T KNOW WHEN I’LL BE APPEARING CLOSE TO YOU, BUT KEEP THAT EXTRA BUNK MADE UP IN CASE I GET TO Flint.
 
SINCERELY,
STEVE MARTIN
 
P.S. I’LL ALWAYS CHERISH THAT AFTERNOON WE SPENT TOGETHER IN RIO, WALKING ALONG THE BEACH, LOOKING AT rocks.

8. Pixar Movies Don’t Get Finished

Back in 2008, avid Disney and Pixar fan Adam wrote a letter to Pete Docter, the award-winning director of Monsters, Inc and at the yet to be released film, Up. Hoping for a signed photo, Adam got a reply letter he will never forget. [Disney, etc via Letters of Note]

pixar-movies-dont-get-finished

pixar-movies-dont-get-finished-2

Hey Adam!
 
First off, let me apologize for taking so long to respond to your very kind letter. Things are pretty nuts around here. You had asked for an autographed photo of me; I don’t really have anything like that, not being famous. But here is a drawing of me for you.
 
I’m sure you can see the resemblance.
 
You are sure right about the importance of a good story in movies. Unfortunately, it’s not as easy as it sounds. It takes a lot of work (and rework, and rework and rework) to get it right. And even then quite often we’re not 100% pleased.
 
As John Lasseter likes to say, our films don’t get finished, they just get released.
 
Hope you enjoy “UP” next year!

9. 1964: Kubrick’s Collaboration Odyssey

On 31 March 1964 Kubrick sent a letter to author Arthur C. Clarke to see if he wanted to collaborate on the “proverbial ‘really good’ science-fiction movie.” Four years later, 2001: A Space Odyssey was released. [via Letters of Note]

Kubrick_and_Arthur_Clarke

Dear Mr Clarke:
 
It’s a very interesting coincidence that our mutual friend Caras mentioned you in a conversation we were having about a Questar telescope. I had been a great admirer of your books for quite a time and had always wanted to discuss with you the possibility of doing the proverbial “really good” science-fiction movie.
 
My main interest lies along these broad areas, naturally assuming great plot and character:
1. The reasons for believing in the existence of intelligent extra-terrestrial life.
2. The impact (and perhaps even lack of impact in some quarters) such discovery would have on Earth in the near future.
3. A space probe with a landing and exploration of the Moon and Mars.
 
Roger tells me you are planning to come to New York this summer. Do you have an inflexible schedule? If not, would you consider coming sooner with a view to a meeting, the purpose of which would be to determine whether an idea might exist or arise which could sufficiently interest both of us enough to want to collaborate on a screenplay?
 
Incidentally, “Sky & Telescope” advertise a number of scopes. If one has the room for a medium size scope on a pedestal, say the size of a camera tripod, is there any particular model in a class by itself, as the Questar is for small portable scopes?
 
Best regards,
Stanley Kubrick

10. Audrey Hepburn on Movies and Music

Upon hearing the musical score for her latest film, Breakfast at Tiffany’s, Hepburn immediately penned the following letter to composer Henry Mancini who would go on to win an Academy Award for the film. [via Letters of Note]

audrey-hepburn-letter-breakfast-at-tiffanys

Dear Henry,
 
I have just seen our picture – BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S – this time with your score.
 
A movie without music is a little bit like an aeroplane without fuel. However beautifully the job is done, we are still on the ground and in a world of reality. Your music has lifted us all up and sent us soaring. Everything we cannot say with words or show with action you have expressed for us. You have done this with so much imagination, fun and beauty.
 
You are the hippest of cats – and the most sensitive of composers!
 
Thank you, dear Hank.
 
Lots of love
Audrey

11. When Keith Met Mick

Back in 1962, a then 18-year old Keith Richards wrote a letter to his Aunt Petty about a number of things including a chance reunion with his childhood friend Mick Jagger. Three months later, The Rolling Stones played their first gig at the Marquee Club in London. [via Letters of Note]

mick-jagger-keith-richards-young

Dear Pat,
 
So sorry not to have written before (I plead insane) in bluebottle voice. Exit right amid deafening applause.
 
I do hope you’re very well.
 
We have survived yet another glorious English Winter. I wonder which day Summer falls on this year?
 
Oh but my dear I have been soooo busy since Christmas beside working at school. You know I was keen on Chuck Berry and I thought I was the only fan for miles but one mornin’ on Dartford Stn. (that’s so I don’t have to write a long word like station) I was holding one of Chuck’s records when a guy I knew at primary school 7-11 yrs y’know came up to me. He’s got every record Chuck Berry ever made and all his mates have too, they are all rhythm and blues fans, real R&B I mean (not this Dinah Shore, Brook Benton crap) Jimmy Reed, Muddy Waters, Chuck, Howlin’ Wolf, John Lee Hooker all the Chicago bluesmen real lowdown stuff, marvelous. Bo Diddley he’s another great.
 
Anyways the guy on the station, he is called Mick Jagger and all the chicks and the boys meet every Saturday morning in the ‘Carousel’ some juke-joint well one morning in Jan I was walking past and decided to look him up. Everybody’s all over me I get invited to about 10 parties. Beside that Mick is the greatest R&B singer this side of the Atlantic and I don’t mean maybe. I play guitar (electric) Chuck style we got us a bass player and drummer and rhythm-guitar and we practice 2 or 3 nights a week. SWINGIN’.
 
Of course they’re all rolling in money and in massive detached houses, crazy, one’s even got a butler. I went round there with Mick (in the car of course Mick’s not mine of course) OH BOY ENGLISH IS IMPOSSIBLE.
 
“Can I get you anything, sir?”
“Vodka and lime, please”
“Certainly, sir”
 
I really felt like a lord, nearly asked for my coronet when I left.
 
Everything here is just fine.
 
I just can’t lay off Chuck Berry though, I recently got an LP of his straight from Chess Records Chicago cost me less than an English record.
 
Of course we’ve still got the old Lags here y’know Cliff Richard, Adam Faith and 2 new shockers Shane Fenton and Jora Leyton SUCH CRAP YOU HAVE NEVER HEARD. Except for that greaseball Sinatra ha ha ha ha ha ha ha.
 
Still I don’t get bored anymore. This Saturday I am going to an all night party.
 
“I looked at my watch
It was four-o-five
Man I didn’t know
If I was dead or alive”
Quote Chuck Berry
Reeling and a Rocking
 
12 galls of Beer Barrel of Cyder, 3 bottle Whiskey Wine. Her ma and pa gone away for the weekend I’ll twist myself till I drop (I’m glad to say).
 
The Saturday after Mick and I are taking 2 girls over to our favourite Rhythm & Blues club over in Ealing, Middlesex.
 
They got a guy on electric harmonica Cyril Davies fabulous always half drunk unshaven plays like a mad man, marvelous.
 
Well then I can’t think of anything else to bore you with, so I’ll sign off goodnight viewers
 
BIG GRIN
 
Luff
Keith xxxxx
Who else would write such bloody crap

12. Wil Wheaton’s 21 Year Response

In 1988, a then 8-year old Teresa Jusino saved up $12 so she could join “WilPower”, the official fan club of Wil Wheaton. For reasons not known, Teresa never got her membership kit. In 2009, the 29-year old Jusino, who was now a writer, suddenly received the following after Wil was alerted to her story. [Teresa Jusino via Letters of Note]

wil-wheaton-fan-club-letter

Dear 8 year-old Teresa,
 
I wanted to apologize to you for making you wait so long to get your official WilPower fanclub membership kit. You see, 15 year-old me is very busy with work and school, and the people who were responsible for getting your membership kit mailed back to you must have made a mistake.
 
It’s been a long time since the fan club did anything, but I’ve enclosed a membership card for you, as well as a wallet photo, and a picture that shows you how much I love Batman (HINT: It’s a lot.)
 
WilPower members got updates about me and my work a few times a year, but the fan club stopped sending those out a long time ago. My latest update, though, goes like this: I got married, I have two boys who I love more than anything in the world, and I’m a writer now, just like you!
 
And now, 8 year-old Teresa, I want to tell you something very important before I sign off, so listen closely: When you grow up, you’re going to be a great writer. I can’t tell you how I know, but I hope you’ll trust me; I just do. So stay in school, always do your best, and treat people the way you want to be treated.
 
Thank you for being part of my fan club,
Wil Wheaton

13. Conan’s Prom Date

In 2003, 11th grader Nikki Simmons took a leap of faith and asked her idol, Conan O’Brien, if he’d like to go to the prom with her. Although he ultimately declined the offer, O’Brien wrote back the following note and doodle. [via Letters of Note]

conan-prom-letter

Dear Nikki –
 
Thanks for your very flattering offer. It’s great to know I have such a devoted fan out there, and I’m sure you would make a great prom date (I didn’t go to mine – it’s a very sad story).
 
Unfortunately, I got married recently and my wife doesn’t allow me to go to proms anymore with cute 16 year old girls. Still, it was very cool of you to ask me. Thanks and have a great evening.
 
Your Friend,
Conan

14. The Most Badass Sign-Off of All Time

In 1775, as the American Revolution War was beginning, Benjamin Franklin penned an angry letter to William Strahan, a British member of parliament who until that point, had been a friend of Franklin’s for thirty years. The sign off at thee end is perhaps the most badass of all time. [Library of Congress via Letters of Note]

benjamin-franklin-enemy-letter

Mr. Strahan
 
You are a Member of Parliament, and one of that Majority which has doomed my Country to Destruction. You have begun to burn our Towns and murder our People. — Look upon your hands! They are stained with the Blood of your Relations! — You and I were long Friends:— You are now my Enemy, — and
 
I am,
 
Yours.
 
B. Franklin

15. Obama on the Differences That Unite Us

In 2012, 10-year old Sophia Bailey-Klugh wrote a letter to President Obama asking for advice on how to respond to school kids that thought it was gross that she has two dads. The President wrote back an incredible response, talking about diversity and the differences that unite us. [Huffington Post via Letters of Note]

obama-letter-to-sophia

Dear Barack Obama,
 
It’s Sophia Bailey Klugh. Your friend who invited you to dinner. You don’t remember okay that’s fine. But I just wanted to tell you that I am so glad you agree that two men can love each other because I have two dads and they love each other. But at school kids think that it’s gross and weird but it really hurts my heart and feelings. So I come to you because you are my hero. If you were me and you had two dads that loved each other, and kids at school teased you about it, what would you do?
 
Please respond!
 
I just wanted to say you really inspire me, and I hope you win on being the president. You would totally make the world a better place.
 
Your friend Sophia
 
P.S. Please tell your daughters Hi for me!

obama-letter-to-sophia-2

Dear Sophia,
 
Thank you for writing me such a thoughtful letter about your family. Reading it made me proud to be your president and even more hopeful about the future of our nation.
 
In America, no two families look the same. We celebrate this diversity. And we recognize that whether you have two dads or one mom what matters above all is the love we show one another. You are very fortunate to have two parents who care deeply for you. They are lucky to have such an exceptional daughter in you.
 
Our differences unite us. You and I are blessed to live in a country where we are born equal no matter what we look like on the outside, where we grow up, or who our parents are. A good rule is to treat others the way you hope they will treat you. Remind your friends at school about this rule if they say something that hurts your feelings.
 
Thanks again for taking the time to write to me. I’m honored to have your support and inspired by your compassion. I’m sorry I couldn’t make it to dinner, but I’ll be sure to tell Sasha and Malia you say hello.
 
Sincerely,

16. Clinton Sends His Condolences

On 5 April 1993, Chris Webber of the Michigan Wolverines called the infamous ‘time-out‘ with 11 seconds left. Unfortunately his team had no more time-outs to call and they lost possession of the ball, ultimately losing the game and the National Championship by a score of 73-71. A dejected Webber (who would on to a successful NBA career) received the following letter of encouragement from then President, Bill Clinton. [Chris Webber via Letters of Note]

bill-clinton-letter-to-chris-weber

Dear Chris,
 
I have been thinking of you a lot since I sat glued to the TV during the championship game.
 
I know that there may be nothing I or anyone else can say to ease the pain and disappointment of what happened.
 
Still, for whatever it’s worth, you, and your team, were terrific. And part of playing for high stakes under great pressure is the constant risk of mental error. I know. I have lost two political races and made countless mistakes over the last twenty years. What matters is the intensity, integrity, and courage you bring to the effort. That is certainly what you have done. You can always regret what occurred but don’t let it get you down or take away the satisfaction of what you have accomplished.
 
You have a great future. Hang in there.
 
Sincerely,
Bill Clinton

17. Iggy Tells a Fan It Gets Better

Back in 1995, a then 21-year old fan named Laurence wrote a 20-page letter to one of her music idols, Iggy Pop. Nine months later, Laurence received the uplifting letter below including details that demonstrated he had read the entire letter she had sent. [via Letters of Note]

iggy-pop-letter

iggy-pop-letter-2

dear laurence,
 
thankyou for your gorgeous and charming letter, you brighten up my dim life. i read the whole fucking thing, dear. of course, i’d love to see you in your black dress and your white socks too. but most of all i want to see you take a deep breath and do whatever you must to survive and find something to be that you can love. you’re obviously a bright fucking chick, w/ a big heart too and i want to wish you a (belated) HAPPY HAPPY HAPPY 21st b’day and happy spirit. i was very miserable and fighting hard on my 21st b’day, too. people booed me on the stage, and i was staying in someone else’s house and i was scared. it’s been a long road since then, but pressure never ends in this life. ‘perforation problems’ by the way means to me also the holes that will always exist in any story we try to make of our lives. so hang on, my love, and grow big and strong and take your hits and keep going.
 
all my love to a really beautiful girl. that’s you laurence.
 
iggy pop

18. I love my wife. My wife is dead

In June of 1945, Arline Feynman, the wife of influential physicist Richard Feynman, died of tuberculosis. 16 months later, Feynman wrote the following letter, which remained sealed until after his death in 1988. [via Letters of Note]

richard-feynman-portrait

D’Arline,
 
I adore you, sweetheart.
 
I know how much you like to hear that — but I don’t only write it because you like it — I write it because it makes me warm all over inside to write it to you.
 
It is such a terribly long time since I last wrote to you — almost two years but I know you’ll excuse me because you understand how I am, stubborn and realistic; and I thought there was no sense to writing.
 
But now I know my darling wife that it is right to do what I have delayed in doing, and that I have done so much in the past. I want to tell you I love you. I want to love you. I always will love you.
 
I find it hard to understand in my mind what it means to love you after you are dead — but I still want to comfort and take care of you — and I want you to love me and care for me. I want to have problems to discuss with you — I want to do little projects with you. I never thought until just now that we can do that. What should we do. We started to learn to make clothes together — or learn Chinese — or getting a movie projector. Can’t I do something now? No. I am alone without you and you were the “idea-woman” and general instigator of all our wild adventures.
 
When you were sick you worried because you could not give me something that you wanted to and thought I needed. You needn’t have worried. Just as I told you then there was no real need because I loved you in so many ways so much. And now it is clearly even more true — you can give me nothing now yet I love you so that you stand in my way of loving anyone else — but I want you to stand there. You, dead, are so much better than anyone else alive.
 
I know you will assure me that I am foolish and that you want me to have full happiness and don’t want to be in my way. I’ll bet you are surprised that I don’t even have a girlfriend (except you, sweetheart) after two years. But you can’t help it, darling, nor can I — I don’t understand it, for I have met many girls and very nice ones and I don’t want to remain alone — but in two or three meetings they all seem ashes. You only are left to me. You are real.
 
My darling wife, I do adore you.
 
I love my wife. My wife is dead.
 
Rich.
PS Please excuse my not mailing this — but I don’t know your new address.

19. Ansel Adams Discovers Love

In 1936, legendary landscape photographer Ansel Adams suffered a nervous breakdown. After a multi-month recovery, Adams penned the following letter to his best friend, Cedric Wright on 19 June 1937. [via Letters of Note]

Ansel_Adams_and_camera

Dear Cedric,
 
A strange thing happened to me today. I saw a big thundercloud move down over Half Dome, and it was so big and clear and brilliant that it made me see many things that were drifting around inside of me; things that related to those who are loved and those who are real friends.
 
For the first time I know what love is; what friends are; and what art should be.
 
Love is a seeking for a way of life; the way that cannot be followed alone; the resonance of all spiritual and physical things. Children are not only of flesh and blood — children may be ideas, thoughts, emotions. The person of the one who is loved is a form composed of a myriad mirrors reflecting and illuminating the powers and thoughts and the emotions that are within you, and flashing another kind of light from within. No words or deeds may encompass it.
 
Friendship is another form of love — more passive perhaps, but full of the transmitting and acceptance of things like thunderclouds and grass and the clean granite of reality.
 
Art is both love and friendship, and understanding; the desire to give. It is not charity, which is the giving of Things, it is more than kindness which is the giving of self. It is both the taking and giving of beauty, the turning out to the light the inner folds of the awareness of the spirit. It is the recreation on another plane of the realities of the world; the tragic and wonderful realities of earth and men, and of all the inter-relations of these.
 
I wish the thundercloud had moved up over Tahoe and let loose on you; I could wish you nothing finer.
 
Ansel

20. Steinbeck on Love

In November of 1958, acclaimed author John Steinbeck received a letter from his eldest son Thom who was attending boarding school at the time. Thom had met a young girl named Susan and believed he was falling in love with her. He asked his dad for advice, and Steinbeck wrote back the following. [via Letters of Note]

john-steinbeck

Dear Thom:
 
We had your letter this morning. I will answer it from my point of view and of course Elaine will from hers.
 
First—if you are in love—that’s a good thing—that’s about the best thing that can happen to anyone. Don’t let anyone make it small or light to you.
 
Second—There are several kinds of love. One is a selfish, mean, grasping, egotistical thing which uses love for self-importance. This is the ugly and crippling kind. The other is an outpouring of everything good in you—of kindness and consideration and respect—not only the social respect of manners but the greater respect which is recognition of another person as unique and valuable. The first kind can make you sick and small and weak but the second can release in you strength, and courage and goodness and even wisdom you didn’t know you had.
 
You say this is not puppy love. If you feel so deeply—of course it isn’t puppy love.
 
But I don’t think you were asking me what you feel. You know better than anyone. What you wanted me to help you with is what to do about it—and that I can tell you.
 
Glory in it for one thing and be very glad and grateful for it.
 
The object of love is the best and most beautiful. Try to live up to it.
 
If you love someone—there is no possible harm in saying so—only you must remember that some people are very shy and sometimes the saying must take that shyness into consideration.
 
Girls have a way of knowing or feeling what you feel, but they usually like to hear it also.
 
It sometimes happens that what you feel is not returned for one reason or another—but that does not make your feeling less valuable and good.
 
Lastly, I know your feeling because I have it and I’m glad you have it.
 
We will be glad to meet Susan. She will be very welcome. But Elaine will make all such arrangements because that is her province and she will be very glad to. She knows about love too and maybe she can give you more help than I can.
 
And don’t worry about losing. If it is right, it happens—The main thing is not to hurry. Nothing good gets away.
 
Love,
Fa

LETTERS OF NOTE
Website | Facebook | Tumblr | Twitter | Buy the book

Read more: http://twistedsifter.com/2015/02/20-amazing-letters-worth-reading/

The post 20 Amazing Letters Worth Reading appeared first on Movie Guide To Everything.

]]>
http://movieguideto.com/awesome/20-amazing-letters-worth-reading/feed/ 0
Sharkarantula vs Snakeorpion – Official Movie TRAILER (2017) http://movieguideto.com/videos/sharkarantula-vs-snakeorpion-official-movie-trailer-2017/ http://movieguideto.com/videos/sharkarantula-vs-snakeorpion-official-movie-trailer-2017/#respond Sat, 17 Jun 2017 16:15:43 +0000 http://movieguideto.com/?p=7209 A tribute to/parody of SyFy-Asylum monster movies. Unimaginable creatures, dirtiest CGI. Our funniest trash guilty pleasure!!! – (This is a fake trailer). Official website: REVIEWS:

The post Sharkarantula vs Snakeorpion – Official Movie TRAILER (2017) appeared first on Movie Guide To Everything.

]]>

A tribute to/parody of SyFy-Asylum monster movies. Unimaginable creatures, dirtiest CGI. Our funniest trash guilty pleasure!!! – (This is a fake trailer). Official website:
REVIEWS:

The post Sharkarantula vs Snakeorpion – Official Movie TRAILER (2017) appeared first on Movie Guide To Everything.

]]>
http://movieguideto.com/videos/sharkarantula-vs-snakeorpion-official-movie-trailer-2017/feed/ 0
Alicia Keys Believes Aliens Are On Earth And Other Very Important Revelations http://movieguideto.com/awesome/alicia-keys-believes-aliens-are-on-earth-and-other-very-important-revelations/ http://movieguideto.com/awesome/alicia-keys-believes-aliens-are-on-earth-and-other-very-important-revelations/#respond Sat, 17 Jun 2017 06:21:02 +0000 http://buzzfeed.com/jordanzakarin/alicia-keys-believes-aliens-are-on-earth View this image › Stephen Lovekin / Getty Images Alicia Keys executive produced and composed the score for the new independent drama The Inevitable Defeat of Mister and Pete, a passion project that so filled her with joy that she was downright silly during the film’s press day in New York earlier this week. The […]

The post Alicia Keys Believes Aliens Are On Earth And Other Very Important Revelations appeared first on Movie Guide To Everything.

]]>

Stephen Lovekin / Getty Images

Alicia Keys executive produced and composed the score for the new independent drama The Inevitable Defeat of Mister and Pete, a passion project that so filled her with joy that she was downright silly during the film’s press day in New York earlier this week.

The movie, directed by George Tillman, Jr., is about two kids who find themselves scraping for survival one summer in the projects of Brooklyn after their junkie mothers get locked up on drug charges. Keys read — and flipped for — the script early on, and helped sign up a cast led by Jennifer Hudson (who has purple hair and is covered in tattoos), Jordin Sparks, Anthony Mackie, Jeffrey Wright, and the young Skylan Brooks.

Keys’ interview with BuzzFeed touched on several crucial topics, including whether she’d go into space with ET and why she’s afraid of heights.

Andrew H. Walker / Getty Images

If you had to pick another stage name right now, what would it be?

AK: Well, I came up with my Bond Girl name the other day. I was feeling very Bond… And so my Bond Girl name is Kitty Keys. First name changes.

How were you feeling very Bond?

AK: It was this moment, it was a shoot we were doing and it just had this vibe. The music we were playing was very Bond, so my inner-Kitty Keys came out.

Did you know you had an inner-Kitty Keys before that?

AK: No, it was spontaneous.

You should do an album under that name.

AK: Like K3ys.

Maybe a “Z” at the end.

AK: That’s my new joint, K3yz.

Do you believe that aliens exist?

AK: Yeah, I do [laughs].

Do you think they’ll visit earth?

AK: I think they’re here now [laughing].

Living among us?

AK: Yeah!

You ever meet anyone you think is an alien?

AK: Yeah, I’ve met some serious aliens in my life, for sure [laughs]. I’m sure you’ve seen a UFO. Haven’t all of us seen something flying in the sky, and it’s at some random time of night that doesn’t make sense, and it’s not the shape of a plane?

If an alien wanted to take you to space, would you go?

AK: I don’t know if I’d go with an alien to space. I would have to feel the alien’s vibe. I’m a vibe person. If it was ET, I may go [laughs].

He seemed pretty legit.

AK: Exactly. It had to be the right vibe. If it was one of those crazy, nutso dudes my brother watches — he always wants me to watch these movies with him and I’m like, No! — I wouldn’t go with that one.

You could sing for them.

AK: Yeah, we’d just go vibe out. K3yz, the name of my ship. Now if that’s not a damn good story, I don’t know what you’ve got.

This is going to be all over the internet.

AK: Draw me a picture.

You want me to draw a picture of it?

AK: Not you particularly. Someone who can draw [laughs].

OK, because you see my handwriting on these notes. I’m not great with a pen.

AK: Nope, you can’t even write, let alone draw.

This is Sanskrit, actually. If I lived in an era before computers, I would be homeless, probably.

AK: That’s what I’m concerned with my son! He writes well, he’s only two.

He knows how to write at two?

AK: Yeah, he knows how to do a lot of things. He’s pretty amazing. He can swim. But these schools, man, they’re not even focusing on any writing or penmanship. His handwriting could look like yours if I don’t stay on him.

Kevork Djansezian / Getty Images

If you could have another talent, outside of music, and you could change talents with anyone else in the world for a week, what or whose would it be?

AK: It’s not a person, but I would be in Cirque du Soleil.

As an acrobat? Have you ever tried to do that sort of stuff?

AK: I’m secretly afraid of heights. I went to Six Flags Great Adventure. It was cool. My family was there, everyone was bugging, good times in the summer. So fun. And I chose to do this ride. I don’t even know the name of it, but it’s the one where they hook you on to a string and they pull you up to the top thing, and then they just drop you. And I knew, I saw them doing it, and I decided to go up there, and they pulled me up.

There are two people, and one person has to pull the latch that actually drops you. So that was me. Then they put me up to the top, and I had to stay there because you can’t go until the second group comes up, and they got stuck. So I’m up there at the top, watching the thing and the people coming, they got stuck, and so by the time they had figured it out and brought them up, I had freaked my whole self out. I was like, I’m gonna die. I don’t know why I’m here. This is not even fun. I’m gonna crash. My mind started flipping out, and the only way to get down was I had to pull that thing, so I pulled it and I dropped, and ever since then, the whole heights thing with me…

So you didn’t enjoy the drop?

AK: It was the crazy anticipation of before the drop that ruined it. I think there’s a window of time where it’s excitement, and then it’s ruined and it’s over. So now I’m scared of heights.

You fly all the time.

AK: Not that type of heights. Roller coaster heights, hanging from something really high. I’m just really freaked out.

So you wouldn’t go hang gliding?

AK: I don’t think so, but maybe. I definitely wouldn’t go skydiving. Hell no. Why would you want to do that to yourself?

Do you have a whole room for your Grammys?

AK: Well, I never used to put those anywhere, except for in a box, because I felt maybe funny displaying them. And finally, just recently, I was putting together my office and my engineer was like, Don’t you want to put your Grammys up? We could get a shelf or something. And I was like, Well, OK. And so we got a shelf and while I was away, she put everything on it, and when I walked into my office, I was like, Whoa. I never saw it like that before. I never saw them displayed.

If I had a Grammy, I’d carry it around everywhere. Do you ever eat cereal out of them?

AK: Nah, but now, I have a little shelf with awards and it’s cool.

Does it get boring winning all those awards? Are you ever bummed like, Ugh, gotta make another speech?

AK: Nah, doesn’t get boring. Sorry! Just letting you know.

How about your “Empire State of Mind” song with Jay-Z?

AK: Are you sick of it?

No, but I’m wondering if you are, since it’s your voice.

AK: No, I’m not sick of it, but I do get concerned that other people are going to get sick of it. I sing it a lot. You know, there are songs like that, that you start out loving and then are like, Ugh, c’mon. I’m not saying that this one belongs in that category, but I’m just checking.

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/jordanzakarin/alicia-keys-believes-aliens-are-on-earth

The post Alicia Keys Believes Aliens Are On Earth And Other Very Important Revelations appeared first on Movie Guide To Everything.

]]>
http://movieguideto.com/awesome/alicia-keys-believes-aliens-are-on-earth-and-other-very-important-revelations/feed/ 0
The Trouble With Gwen Stacy In “The Amazing Spider-Man 2” http://movieguideto.com/awesome/the-trouble-with-gwen-stacy-in-the-amazing-spider-man-2/ http://movieguideto.com/awesome/the-trouble-with-gwen-stacy-in-the-amazing-spider-man-2/#respond Fri, 16 Jun 2017 06:20:59 +0000 http://buzzfeed.com/alisonwillmore/the-trouble-with-gwen-stacy-in-the-amazing-spider-man-2 Emma Stone’s character had a date with comic book destiny in the Spider-Man sequel. Here’s why it stung. Warning: This post contains major spoilers about the end of The Amazing Spider-Man 2 — read at your own risk. View this image › Columbia Pictures In one sense, it’s silly to warn people of what happens […]

The post The Trouble With Gwen Stacy In “The Amazing Spider-Man 2” appeared first on Movie Guide To Everything.

]]>
Emma Stone’s character had a date with comic book destiny in the Spider-Man sequel. Here’s why it stung.

Warning: This post contains major spoilers about the end of The Amazing Spider-Man 2 — read at your own risk.

View this image ›

Columbia Pictures

In one sense, it’s silly to warn people of what happens to Gwen Stacy in The Amazing Spider-Man 2. Peter Parker develops powers after getting bitten by a radioactive spider. Gwen Stacy dies. It’s what she does. She’s Peter’s first love, and famously, at least in comic book terms, she was killed off — in 1973, in a story arc written by Gerry Conway that was one of the signals that the medium as a whole was taking a turn for the darker and grittier. Her absence has been as important as her presence, the shocking intrusion of the reality of death into Spider-Man’s world after he’s become a superhero, a dramatic upping of the stakes and proof of his fallibility.

In having the latest incarnation of the webslinging superhero, played by Andrew Garfield, fall for Emma Stone’s Gwen rather than the more familiar but not yet introduced Mary Jane, The Amazing Spider-Man signaled that it was setting itself up for eventual tragedy. Is Gwen Stacy really Gwen Stacy if she isn’t doomed? The potential was there from the beginning, when Peter told Gwen his secret, kissed her, and leaped off her family’s 20th story balcony to battle the Lizard, as she gasped, with accidental prescience, “I’m in trouble.”

The Trouble With Gwen Stacy In "The Amazing Spider-Man 2"

View this image ›

Columbia Pictures / Via therockdiaries.tumblr.com

It took until this year’s sequel for that trouble to actually catch up with Gwen, but when it finally came calling, it did so in voluptuous and terrible source material-inspired fashion. After Gwen helped Peter defeat Jamie Foxx’s Electro with a power overload and just as the lovers looked poised for happily ever after (“Maybe we can still make your flight!”), the film’s second baddie made his big, viridian entrance. Harry Osborn (Dane DeHaan), who was hustled through his character arc into evilness with unfortunate briskness, appeared in full Green Goblin regalia, spider serumed-out, wearing the OsCorp armor he’d stumbled upon and riding a weaponized glider. Gwen became a hostage in a fight atop a clock tower that left her falling in detail-laden slow motion, looking up at the camera with horrified eyes as Spider-Man leapt to save her and catch her with his webbing — too late.

Marc Webb’s Spider-Man is a darker one than Sam Raimi’s, but the scene in which Gwen’s time ran out still felt like a disruption, like the superhero franchise had, for a moment, run off its tracks and into unfamiliar territory. After all that nimble, CGI-enabled swinging through the city as if physics were incidental, it was as if gravity were having its revenge. Instead of the usual cinematic recovery shot, lids fluttering, eyes slowly opening to reassure the grieving hero, we got a stream of blood from a nostril. And to emphasize the permanence of what had happened and remove all possible question, we then saw Peter at Gwen’s funeral and then at her grave as the seasons turned.

View this image ›

Niko Tavernise/Columbia Pictures

Gwen’s death was an undeniably powerful moment. How could it not be? Real life couple Garfield and Stone have such palpable chemistry and charm together on screen that they’ve managed to make the Spider-Man reboot more compelling as a romance than as a superhero story. They’ve allowed the relationship between Peter and Gwen to be so believable and so refreshingly free from the usual artificially inserted misunderstandings that Gwen’s death comes across as the only way to deal with a love story that can’t be broken up by secret-keeping. The film took care to preemptively relieve Peter of some of his guilt by having Gwen walk into danger of her own accord and to compress his grieving process and get back into the game before the credits rolled, but it still feels like the franchise is going to struggle to recover from killing off its female lead, even with Mary Jane (played by Shailene Woodley or otherwise) waiting in the wings.

Maybe Gwen Stacy had to perish — though like all adaptations, The Amazing Spider-Man and its sequel have picked and chosen their way through their source material, and the version of the character played by Bryce Dallas Howard in Sam Raimi’s Spider-Man 3 didn’t meet the same grisly fate. But her death is undeniably disappointing, and not just because it means that we won’t get more of Garfield and Stone together on screen in these incarnations.

View this image ›

Columbia Pictures

Emma Stone’s Gwen was accorded more vitality and less condescension than the average comic book movie love interest. She was smart and perceptive and let in on Peter’s secret instead of being kept on the outside and left to wait and wonder impatiently. She felt like a partner, not a weight on the protagonist, a weakness, or a prize to be won, and while the series obviously wasn’t about to send Spider-Man off to England to follow her to Oxford, the possibility was oddly tantalizing. What if a superhero franchise had to deal with an ongoing relationship with real-world dilemmas, like whose career priorities (degree or crime-fighting) were allowed to come first?

Instead, Gwen became fodder for more superhero angst, and the planned third and fourth movies are going to have a hell of a time picking up and moving on in her wake. The problem with having a character brought to life the way Stone did is she’s not easily shrugged off, and even as Spider-Man hurtles his way into the future, her absence is going to be felt.

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/alisonwillmore/the-trouble-with-gwen-stacy-in-the-amazing-spider-man-2

The post The Trouble With Gwen Stacy In “The Amazing Spider-Man 2” appeared first on Movie Guide To Everything.

]]>
http://movieguideto.com/awesome/the-trouble-with-gwen-stacy-in-the-amazing-spider-man-2/feed/ 0
The 11 Dumbest Things Said About Women In 2013 http://movieguideto.com/awesome/the-11-dumbest-things-said-about-women-in-2013/ http://movieguideto.com/awesome/the-11-dumbest-things-said-about-women-in-2013/#respond Thu, 15 Jun 2017 06:24:28 +0000 http://buzzfeed.com/katieheaney/the-11-dumbest-things-said-about-women-in-2013 1. That our chances of getting pregnant from rape are “very low.” View this image › AP Photo/Matt York In June, Republican Congressman Trent Franks made the following (scientifically inaccurate, to say the least) comment during a committee hearing on a potential abortion ban: “You know, the incidence of rape resulting in pregnancy are very […]

The post The 11 Dumbest Things Said About Women In 2013 appeared first on Movie Guide To Everything.

]]>

1. That our chances of getting pregnant from rape are “very low.”

AP Photo/Matt York

In June, Republican Congressman Trent Franks made the following (scientifically inaccurate, to say the least) comment during a committee hearing on a potential abortion ban: “You know, the incidence of rape resulting in pregnancy are very low.”

2. “Isn’t it time for a women’s publication that puts world news and politics alongside beauty tips?”

When Bryan Goldberg announced the launch of women’s website Bustle.com, he seemed almost impressively unaware of the many already-existing sites with the same mission he stated above. Also, there was this: “Knowing the difference between mascara, concealer, and eye-liner is not my job.”

3. That we shouldn’t wear pantsuits because we’re women, not men.

Other gems from this piece on women’s fashion trends guys “hate” include hating on red lipstick because “gross you’re going to get that on me,” and “strapless bikinis, they just make your shoulders look like a linebacker’s.”

4. “You will never see as many great women investors or traders as men — period, end of story.”

Hedge fund investor and billionaire Paul Tudor Jones told an audience of University of Virginia students in May that there would never be as many great women investors as men, because once they have children they lose focus: “Every single investment idea … every desire to understand what is going to make this go up or go down is going to be overwhelmed by the most beautiful experience … which a man will never share, about a mode of connection between that mother and that baby.”

5. “[Rihanna promotes] the sort of fashion sense on stage that surely invites rape at worst, disrespect at least.”

Liz Jones, columnist at the Daily Mail, wrote an article shaming Rihanna for her apparent (according to Jones) failure to be a role model for young women. Jones also wrote: “Is it fair that we berate female stars for being bad, when we don’t admonish men in the same way? Yes, it is fair. Because young women are far more impressionable than young men.”

6. “Women no longer need to be beautiful in order to express their talent. Lena Dunham and Adele and Lady Gaga and Amy Adams are all perfectly plain, and they are all at the top of their field.”

The above comes from writer Stephen Marche, in a profile of Megan Fox for Esquire’s February 2013 issue, which also includes a number of totally insane descriptions of Megan Fox’s appearance: “Megan Fox is not an ancient Aztec. She’s a screen saver on a teenage boy’s laptop, a middle-aged lawyer’s shower fantasy, a sexual prop used to sell movies and jeans.”

7. “Women are forced to pretend to be men. They’re feigning this toughness. They’re miserable. Study after study has shown that feminism has made women less happy.”

In October, during a HuffPost Live conversation about the meaning of contemporary masculinity, Vice co-founder Gavin McInnes argued that women don’t really want to work, and what they “naturally” want to do is raise families.

8. “Some women’s bodies just actually don’t work [in yoga pants].”

After a Lululemon recall of see-through yoga pants, founder Chip Wilson blamed the women wearing them: “Quite frankly, some women’s bodies just actually don’t work. It’s about the rubbing through the thighs.”

9. “When you look at biology — when you look at the natural world — the roles of a male and a female in society and in other animals, the male typically is the dominant role.”

In May, Fox contributor Erick Erickson called it “anti-science” to reject the idea of male breadwinners as the only sustainable model for the nuclear family. He went on to say that “having mom as primary breadwinner is bad for kids and bad for marriage.”

10. “A woman in public life is getting past her sell-by date at 69.”

Wesley Pruden, in the Washington Times finds Hillary Clinton’s age “not particularly old for a man,” but inexcusable for a woman.

11. “Know your role and shut your mouth.”

During a June debate on the Fox program Hannity, conservative radio host Bill Cunningham told Fox contributor Tamara Holder: “Wait a minute. You shut up. Know your role and shut your mouth.” Holder asked, “My role as a woman?” and Cunningham responded, “Yeah. Yeah,” and subsequently asked if Holder was “going to cry.”

Read more: http://buzzfeed.com/katieheaney/the-11-dumbest-things-said-about-women-in-2013

The post The 11 Dumbest Things Said About Women In 2013 appeared first on Movie Guide To Everything.

]]>
http://movieguideto.com/awesome/the-11-dumbest-things-said-about-women-in-2013/feed/ 0